Wednesday, April 3, 2013

Handmade Resin Wine Cork Table!

I know you guys have seen some "sneak peeks" of the wine cork table top that I made, but I finally finished the whole thing, and it's off to its home. Though it was a little bit of a challenge to make, we were really happy with the results. I'm sure that it'll be a cool piece for my client to own, and I'm guessing he will keep it forever! 

Here's the backstory, incase you don't know: my client is a bit of a wine connoisseur, and had saved lots and lots of corks up. The designer decided that she wanted to do something creative with them for his "bonus room" type of area, and spotted an old high-top table top that wasn't really being put to use. She'd seen my penny tile table project, and thought that maybe we could do something similar with the corks. And voila! The idea was hatched. I was a little reluctant to work on it, because of my past troubles with resin (It's a PAIN to work with. Have any of you guys used it?!), but I agreed to, and it was fine. I had no issues with the resin drying this time (not sure if it was temperature changes or the fact that I am getting used to working with resin), and only a few minor hang-ups in the process. The only real issue was that it took way more pours than I thought it would. I thought it would be 1 or 2; it ended up being 6! All in all, it helped with my learning experience, and I'm happy to have done it. These things are sometimes challenging, but I actually enjoying learning new materials and figuring out the challenges that arise. (though, I probably wouldn't say that during the process, haha)

Anyway, enough blabbering! Here are some pictures. Let me know if you have resin questions in the comments section!

So, I just had the top of the table -- it will be on a heavy metal base, so keep that in mind. It's just sitting on a dresser at my studio in these photos.

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Some people have asked how I framed out the resin, and the answer is simple: with painter's tape. You can just wrap it around your table, and then do your pour. The tape will hold in the resin, and you remove it after the pour dries (after several hours. It doesn't have to be completely dry, but needs to obviously not drip when you pull the tape off). You will have to redo your tape for each pour, or your tape might get stuck in the resin. I learned this the hard way. Thankfully, it's pretty easy to remove with an electric sander, but it would've been nice had that issue never arisen. 

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I made the pattern of corks by chopping each cork in half with a kitchen bread knife (not as hard as it sounds), then gluing them on with elmer's glue chopped-side-down). I chopped them in half, because I thought it would make less pours that way. I was halfway right. ;) 

super detail shot:
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you can make the sides smooth by sanding them down by hand. it's easy. 

as you can see, I did a coat of brown paint along the bottom edge before doing my last pour. The last pour, I let drip down and cover the sides, for smoothness and protection. Every pour was really calculated. See? I'm getting the hang of it! 

I think this photo shows (a little bit - it's actually not really noticeable in person, unless you are 3 inches away, like I was when I took this photo) the pour layers a little, which is cool:
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 photo 623efbc9-53c6-4616-8d2e-974abd96c778_zpsc712b92a.jpg

what do you think?


Here are a few photos from when I was doing the pours - before it was done!

After the first pour:
 photo 63381E0D-A971-48A1-918E-EC36134E5031-1850-0000022FCB105587_zps67ae0a2b.jpg

this was the day that HGTV was filming at the studio (I'm going to be painting a mural on an episode of "Elbow Room" this spring), but you can see the little cork tops sticking out of the top of the resin here. You can also see my tape corral.

and here was a photo I took before the last pour, I think. Almost done, but some of those corks are still making the top not smooth. This might have been before the last two pours, actually. The last few were like, "I'm allllmost there, but not quite", which was frustrating! It was completely smooth in the end. 
 photo 80f27e99-4cbd-4b70-87f6-547f0524a2f3_zps4cf8d483.jpg


OK, I think that's about it. Hope you enjoyed my long-winded post!

*** UPDATE ***

I just received a picture from the designer from this project ,with the tabletop in its final home! Look how cool!

 photo 9d773431-7946-49a4-b561-c14babc15fe6_zps39198461.jpg

34 comments:

  1. amazing....... it is!!!!!

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    1. Your Dad is Yoda? Cool! : ) Happened upon your wine cork table top when searching for ideas. My son is trying to design a table. I think he wants to use glass over the top, though. Your table looks really great! Cheers!

      -Karen

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  2. This is wonderful!!! I love it!

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  3. It's so awesome! I am frustrated for you just reading it. Gracious!

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    1. haha, thank you. commiseration definitely helps! im just glad it turned out nice!

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  4. Curious, why didn't you lay them flat instead of cutting them in half? Or cut them in half long ways? Then you could still read the cork? Design decision or having them flat wouldn't work?

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    1. hey! i actually was going to do that -- it was the initial plan. two reasons why i didnt: one, it was really hard to chop the corks from that angle; two, the pattern didnt look good that way. it gave too much room inbetween the cork bottoms, the further out the "starburst" pattern worked, and it didn't look very pattern-y at all. good questions though!

      you can actually still read the corks from the sides, in this arrangement, though, since the resin is clear, and the corks have a little room between them!

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  5. Do a post on safety & safety gear.

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    1. hah! hmmm... i'm not sure if my readers would find that very interesting, but maybe i will! :)

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  6. Amazeballs! (I've been waiting for an update, but didn't want to ask in case it went all kinds of wrong...) Definitely a conversation piece, something personal I'm sure he'll keep forever! Destiny

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    1. haha, thank you destiny! it's actually been done for at least a month or more now. phew! it was an undertaking.

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  7. That turned out awesome!! You're awesome! One day I'm gonna have you do some projects for me. Maybe I'll start collecting my corks now. You should also find out where those barstools are from!

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    1. thanks, liiiiiiiiiz!

      i know, the barstools are awesome. i'll find out and post on here!

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  8. It looks amazing!!! Once again, great job ; )

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  9. Where did you get your resin, do you get a better deal to buy in that much bulk? About how much did it take, and how did you get the bubbles out?

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    1. hey simon,

      i bought it at lowe's, and no, i didn't get it cheaper. i want to find out how to buy it in bulk, though, because doing 6 pours was painful! it's super expensive, too. each gallon is $70 at lowe's, plus all the buckets you have to use to mix it in. i'd say each pour cost $80. ugh!

      as far as bubbles, you can get them out easily with a hairdryer on high heat! if there are only a couple, you can blow them out manually, but i have found a hairdryer is pretty awesome for this. when i first started working with resin, i was really concerned about it drying on me before i was able to finish it, but i've realized this isn't so much of a concern. you have time!

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  10. Ok so I read this post and the penny table post and they both look great! Now... we plan on doing a penny floor in our kitchen. Will we have to pour resin on the floor too or is there some other product that will be useful with a larger scale area? Seems like a lot of resin would have to be used for sq footage like that.

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    1. hey susan!

      i wouldn't use resin on a floor. it says on the package that it's not recommended (plus it's REALLY expensive). i think the best way to use pennies on a floor is to use them like tile, and use mortar or whatever! there are lots of blog posts and youtube videos on the subject, so i'd do a little research there to find out what to use. i also discovered that you can actually buy sheets of pennies, if you are wanting to tile a big space! i thought that was pretty cool.

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    2. Thanks for all the info! I also thought it would be ridiculously expensive to have to resin a floor, plus a little impossible! What if there's a bubble 15 feet away and I need to blow it out! haha! I've seen people use liquid nails to set them on the floor and in some videos I've seen people seal with some type of sealant that they roll on with a paint roller... still haven't found out what that is though. I have seen the sheet templates, but didn't know you could buy full penny sheets. My father in law owns a coin store so I think we are going to get all 2012 pennies (the year we bought the home) and get the templates. :)

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  11. It's perfect in its forever home. The barstools compliment it perfectly! Job done and well... Destiny

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  12. Hi Kristen,
    I was wondering what kid of tape did you use before you poued the resin and did you change the tape after every resin pour. Plus I am glad I came across your blog. You have done great job with all your projects.

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  13. Hello Kristen.
    I've made resin table but the top part came out wavy or ripply, how did you get it so straight ? did you have to do any sanding?
    Thank you.
    Emile

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  14. Hi Kristen, I just came across your blog through a Pinterest pinned project. Love how we can discover cool things so easily nowadays! Nice work with your cork table top! I empathise with you on how challenging it could get to work with resin. I do it almost every day as I make decorative resin table tops and panels for a living and depending on the weather and/or room temperature conditions I know it can sometimes be a challenge to get it all done to perfection! I mainly use organic embedments for my line of products, not corks yet, but I have had special requests from my clients that are definitely fun to carry out!! You can also use duck tape to build your walls to hold your resin pour, they stand bit more weight, but you'll need a bit of sanding and buffing after removing it. Worth it if you really want to have straight edges though!! Keep up your work and if you have the chance check my resin creations at www.fogliart.com Cheers!!!!

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  15. Beautiful. What type of resin did you use and how much did it take? What do you think the final cure time was? A work of art!

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